65 Comments
May 5Liked by Gurwinder

Best Sunday read I've seen in a long while, kudos

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May 5Liked by Gurwinder

#5 made me laugh so hard I

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this is lovely, thank you so much.

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May 5Liked by Gurwinder

The gospel according to Gurwinder. Awesome read!

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"(When writing, I end each day mid-sentence because it ....)"

😉🙂

But seems a fairly decent start on a modern-day "Guide for the Perplexed", even if I can't say I've more than skimmed it. Though, en passant, I quite "like" the finality principle -- reminds me of the quip, "Depend on it sir, knowing that one is to be hung in a fortnight sharpens the mind wonderfully." 🙂

However, I might suggest an addition, though you might have already included it, that being the dichotomy between map and territory:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Map%E2%80%93territory_relation

Losing sight of the difference seems to cause no end of problems.

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Gurwinder, you’re unequivocally the best writer I’ve encountered on Substack.

Man, how that Woozle Effect has run roughshod over informed debate/dissent!

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These "rules of thumb" are some of the best reading, learning, and contemplation I experience. I save these lists and review them periodically. This is not to memorize them--although remembering them would not be a bad thing--but to reignite the neurons these insights massage! Kudos!

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Asterisk on #25 is that, so long as judgments are made independently, ensembles of judgments necessarily reduce noise and improve accuracy.

When judgments are not made independently—that is, influenced by others around us—biases tend to compound and pull us further from the truth.

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May 6Liked by Gurwinder

thanks for sharing! some of these things i'd felt like i noticed in myself and others before but didn't have the language to describe.

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May 6Liked by Gurwinder

That article hits the jackpot! You've provided a toolbox of interesting ideas to explore, from communication to decision-making. Thanks for curating such a thought-provoking list!

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#6-The Naxalt Fallacy is a dangerous game people play in general conversation. Casual comments using "The _____(blank) people all do this or that' is where bias is created in the minds of the listeners. Whether intentional or not, it still happens. We could do well to watch our tongue with generalizations and keep from poisoning others with non-facts. And stop spreading prejudices unnecessarily. Good job!

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Number 5 made me gasp, followed by the quick thought, "I could never!" So I will. I'm actually excited to try it. Great list of concepts to ponder. Thank you.

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Sounds like it might let a writer leap-frog right over the daily warm-up stage and go straight to the free flow of ideas. I'm in!! :)

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"If you want to stop receiving provocations, stop being provoked. When the narcissist realizes they can’t manipulate your emotions, they’ll stop trying." Wish I'd had this advice during my first marriage. >< It has taken me a lifetime to realize that this has been my problem all along. I haven't learned to handle it better; I've learned better how to avoid people and situations that provoke me.

So much great wisdom in this article! A fun and thought provoking read. Thank you.

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May 6Liked by Gurwinder

I would suggest that the 'dopamine culture' of sport (in terms of instant gratification) is watching highlight reels instead of matches, and when you do watch a match you watch it on time and a half to be 'more efficient' (an idea that horrifies me. Who wants to be efficient when watching sport?)

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May 5Liked by Gurwinder

Excellent knowledge

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May 5Liked by Gurwinder

Witty and wise

Just the name Woozle Effect merits a smile

Many are obvious on reflection but still worth pointing out and identifying.

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